Get in the Habit of Including Strong Calls to Action

Act now
Act now
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Everything you publish, whether it’s a sales page, a social media post, or a blog post – it needs to include a strong call to action. Most people will not do anything other than like, or maybe share something they think is interesting, but they’re not going to click through or buy without a call to action. If you want to increase your profit margin automatically, all you need to do is include strong calls to action on anything you publish.

What is a CTA?

A call to action is simply something that tells your ideal audience what to do next. It’s the thing the customer must do in order to get the results they want. A CTA describes what you want the reader or view to do next.

What makes a CTA strong?

To craft a strong call to action, it needs to be designed well, carry the right message, be in the right place so they’ll see it, and it should be something you can test. For example, your CTA needs to be a real action that you can account for. A click, a comment, a like, a share, a purchase – are all trackable using technology. Your CTA needs to be something you can test.

Using Your CTAs

Where you put a CTA totally depends on what platform you’re using and whether it’s a sales page, a blog post, or a social media post or something else entirely. Plus, it matters who your audience is and what they’re expecting to experience. The fact is, if you’re going to publish anything, it needs a CTA. If you are having issues coming up with a CTA, it may be because your content has no reason for existing.

Practice

You’ll want to practice using CTAs so that you grow more accustomed to doing it automatically. Before you post that next article you read, or that cat on the toilet picture, consider what action you want your audience to take next first. Write several CTAs for the one action so that you can schedule it to go out more than once with different CTAs so that the content always looks fresh.

Test & Track

When you create a CTA, you’ll want to note it in a spreadsheet or other record-keeping system so that you can remember to go back and test and track. Did the CTA get people to take the action you wanted them to take? How many times did you promote it and where, and did your CTAs work in those places

Finally

Don’t post even a blog post or a social media update without including a simple CTA. A simple one that you didn’t give much thought to is better than nothing at all. Of course, with practice, testing, and tracking, you’ll be able to improve beyond where you are today. As you see what works and what does not work, you’ll be able to make much better choices for your business that will lead to even more success.

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